web summit

Internet disruption could foster a “scary world”

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The lack of Internet control could lead to a “scary” world in the future, said Christopher Wylie, a former Cambridge Analytica employee who attended a Web Summit session on digital media and privacy.

“The internet is used hundreds of times a day, on cell phones, on computers … and there are no rules. When you go to the doctor, if you buy food, you travel by plane, you feel safe, most of you sit down. According to the 29-year-old Canadian whistleblower, he graduated from the London Scholl of Economics and former research director at Cambridge Analytica (CA). between the sound approval of the hundreds of people who filled the Altice Arena in the Parque das Nações.

During a speech moderated by Krishnan Guru Murthy, a British journalist on Channel 4 and a host of Channel 4 News and Unreported World, international politics documentaries, the former head of the AC drew a grim picture of the current unrest in the “information highway” , with particular emphasis on the situation in the United States.

“Who is responsible for regulating the Internet in the United States?” He questioned during the speech. “We sleep more with new technologies than with people, and there are no rules!”

Wylie’s indignation, which showed off a sweater with the phrase “Arrest the President,” is directly related to the consequences of her passing through CA, a company with offices in New York, Washington and London specializing in American politics, and combined data mining and analysis tools.

In 2008, Wylie provided a number of documents to the British newspaper The Guardian describing various methods of CA, including the use of private personal data from 50 million Facebook user account for which the company had no direct access. These data were used to benefit various political campaigns in the course of the 2016 US presidential elections.

The attitude of Christopher Wylie was at the origin of the Cambridge Analytica-Facebook scandal.

Returning to this turbulent past, he referred to Steve Bennan, the former White House strategic chief in the administration of President Donald Trump, and to the way “military strategies” were used to benefit the 2014 Trump campaign for promoting a “cultural war”.

“In war it takes an arsenal and in cultural war the arsenal is information, and the target is people … People who are vulnerable to this information have been identified and hit by the target,” he said.

The Canadian denouncer also told how the CA began “to fracture American society, treating part as terrorists”, the reason for its departure and the beginning of many political and personal problems, as happened years ago with the American Eduard Snowden.

The intervention of Christopher Wylie was mainly a warning sign. About the “new Facebook” and the inability of governments to deal with the situation, about the unknown location where the Internet data in the United States is stored, about the absence of rules.

“It’s necessary an ethical code of conduct, it’s absurd that there is no control, we’re moving people’s lives,” he insisted.

He then proposed a challenge to attentive assistance. Imagine the future, with the house attached to the car, the car attached to the company, the company linked to many other high-tech computer tools, and almost total social alienation.

“Take into account what you do, what other people do, and think ahead. This is a huge problem and you have to think seriously. There is a whole structure that thinks and observes us. Imagine this environment in 20 years, when everyone is ‘on.’ That’s scary. ”

His battle was summed up in an intervention of about 20 minutes, with only brief and precise questions from the moderator.

“What I try to do, and think about, is to tell people to work collectively, to start a discussion about what the future of technology should be, who we should talk to, and the way it should be regulated.”

Krishnan Guru Murthy asked one last question and gave a minute to the answer: “This made your life to be turned upside down, on the outside and inside … was it worth it?”.

“Yes,” he answered almost immediately. “There are changes going on at night and I think I have a duty to talk to people here and around the world and start thinking about it … I think it’s progress.” Christopher Wylie withdrew from the scene amidst a strong salvo of palms.

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