cinema

‘Rage’ won the Sophia Award for Best Picture

167views

The film ‘Raiva’ by Sérgio Tréfaut won the Sophia Prize for best film, from the Portuguese Academy of Cinema, and António-Pedro Vasconcelos, the best director, at the ceremony held on Sunday night at Casino Estoril.

The feature film by Sérgio Tréfaut, who adapts Manuel da Fonseca’s novel ‘Seara de Vento’ in a portrait of labor exploitation and social injustice, led the night by winning six awards, including best actress , Isabel Ruth, best actor, Hugo Bentes, best supporting actor, Adriano Luz, and best photography, Acácio de Almeida.

Filmed in the Alentejo, in black and white, ‘Raiva’ won the best-adapted film award for Sérgio Tréfaut and Fátima Ribeiro, achieving victory in almost all the main categories.

When the film debuted in May last year, at the IndieLisboa festival, Sérgio Tréfaut said that “Raiva” spoke of the abuse of who owns all the wealth, over those who have nothing.

“It’s a completely out-of-date movie, because nowadays the social issue related to social justice, or poverty and the abuse of power on the part of those who have money, is completely out of fashion,” as opposed to identity issues, racial, sexual. “The social issue and poverty do not interest anyone,” even if they do, Sérgio Tréfaut said.

In the accounting of the night, the five prizes of Soldier Millions, of Jorge Passion of the Coast and Gonçalo Galvão Teles, on the soldier Aníbal Milhais, that fought in the First World War. The best film director (Joana Cardoso), best sound (Pedro Melo, Elsa Ferreira, Branko and Ivan Neskov), best director (João Braz) and best special effects (Filipe Pereira and Manuel Jorge).

António-Pedro Vasconcelos’s ‘Parque Mayer’, a period film about the magazine theater and Estado Novo, led the list of nominations, when nominated for 15 awards, but managed three: better makeup and hair (Abigail Machado and Mário Leal) and best wardrobe (Maria Gonzaga), in addition to better performance.

In thanks, António-Pedro Vasconcelos dedicated the prize to the producer and director António da Cunha Telles, who defined as responsible “for everything that was done [good] in Portugal” in the cinema “and everything that was not done, because let him do it, “remembering that the director of” The Siege “did not film” 13 years ago “,” because they do not let him film “.

Vasconcelos complained that “more means for the Portuguese cinema and other policies”, “so as not to lose talent,” especially “among the younger.”

In the seventh edition of the Sophia Awards, the prize for best documentary in a feature film was for ‘The Labyrinth of Saudade’, a film by Miguel Gonçalves Mendes about the thought of the essayist Eduardo Lourenço.

In a short film, the best documentary was “Kids Sapiens Sapiens” by António Aleixo, in which three kids talk about education.

‘Sleepwalk’ by Filipe Melo, won the Sophia for best short fiction. Filmed in the United States, the film is based on a comic strip designed by Filipe Melo and Juan Cavia, for Granta magazine.

As an animated short, Distinguished ‘Entre Sombras’, by Alice Eça Guimarães and Mónica Santos. The film was nominated for the Césares of French cinema in January.

The Sara series, by Marco Martins and Bruno Nogueira, with Beatriz Batarda, screened at RTP2 last year, won the award for best fiction television production.

Ana Bustorff, secondary actress in ‘Ruth’ by António Pinhão Botelho, Manuel João Vieira’s soundtrack for Bruno Almeida’s ‘Cabaret Maxime’, and the song ‘Cudin’ by Tibars (Miguel Moreira) and Vasco Viana, for ‘Djon África’, by João Miller Guerra and Filipa Reis, were others distinguished.

The Sophia career awards, previously announced, were handed to the actors Lia Gama and Pedro Éfe.

The winning films (Best Film, Feature Documentary, Best Short and Sophia Student Prize) will be screened at the first Film Festival to be held nationwide May 13-15.

The Festival of Cinema, with reduced prices in room, will have this year a second edition, in October.

Leave a Response

eleven − three =